Romance Weekly #LoveChatWrite #LoveWriteChat – 26th May 2015

Romance Weekly ChatDo you like to read romance novels? Wouldn’t you like to know more about your favorite authors? Well you came to the right place! Join the writers of Romance Weekly as we go behind the scenes of our books and tell all….. About our writing of course! Every week we’ll answer questions and after you’ve enjoyed the blog on this site we’ll direct you to another. So come back often for a thrilling ride! Tell your friends and feel free to ask us questions in the comment box.

If you’ve arrived from Kate Robbins’ Blog, hi and thanks for clicking!

 This week Jeanne McDonald has asked us to answer some questions about how it feels to be an author.

1. Describe the moment you first felt like a true author, not an aspiring one.

2-am-I-really-published-293x300I think it has to be when Fix You was published. About a month before the publication I was interviewed on my local radio station, which was a lot of fun, and then I was interviewed for my local paper. For the first time I was getting messages from people who had read the book and lived it, and was also seeing the book hit the bestseller list on both Amazon and the iBookstore. It was then that I realised there were lots of people out there buying my book and it felt magical!

2. Name 3 authors who inspire you.

Marian Author Photo small

Marian Keyes

The first is Marian Keyes. I loved her writing since I first read her book, Watermelon, back in the 90s. Her stories are well written and a lot of fun to read, but they don’t shy away from addressing issues such as addiction, marriage problems and even the loss of loved ones. As a person with a platform, Marian also speaks out in support of those with mental health issues, which she does amazingly well. She suffers from depression and her openness and willingness to share her own experiences has taken away some of the stigma this disease carries.

replica by FranÁois D'Albert Durade, oil on canvas, (1849)

The second author I’m inspired by is George Eliot. A woman who wrote books at a time when mostly men were published, she nevertheless managed to find a way around this, by using a man’s name as her pseudonym. In an era when women were only supposed to write light-hearted romances, Eliot addressed political and philosophical questions in her fictions, and was described as among the greatest western writers of all time.

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Daphne Du Maurier

Daphne Du Maurier is my third choice. The opening pages to Rebecca—where she describes a dream about a long-abandoned Manderley—is one of the most beautifully written passages I have read. Evocative and forbidding, she manages to foreshadow the psychologically disturbing plot of the book with a few carefully chosen words.

3. Describe your favourite fan moment.

1402902084_500Some of my favourite memories of the past year have been the lovely messages I have received from Brazilian readers. They are always so lovely and enthusiastic, and with the help of Google translate I’ve managed to have some lively conversations about my book!

Thanks to Jeanne for asking some fun questions. Now let’s hop over to Collette Cameron’s blog and read her answers! 

Romance Weekly #LoveChatWrite #LoveWriteChat – 2nd September

Romance Weekly ChatDo you like to read romance novels? Wouldn’t you like to know more about your favorite authors? Well you came to the right place! Join the writers of Romance Weekly as we go behind the scenes of our books and tell all….. About our writing of course! Every week we’ll answer questions and after you’ve enjoyed the blog on this site we’ll direct you to another. So come back often for a thrilling ride! Tell your friends and feel free to ask us questions in the comment box.

If you’ve arrived from Mischka Jenkins’ blog, hi and thanks for clicking! This week’s questions are brought to you by Ronnie Allen.

 

1.  When do you decide that you’ve done enough editing and changes would now be making it different, not better?

This is a tricky one. Whenever I read something I’ve written, it’s always with a critical eye. I’m never truly happy with the outcome, there’s always something I think I could improve on. But I also believe that over editing can kill the heart of a story–there has to be a happy medium. So nowadays I do three main edits, followed by two proofs. After that, I leave it for the readers to decide if I’ve done enough.

 

2.  When and how do you accept advice by rejection letters and critique partners?

Honest answer? All the time. I’m so aware how little distance I have from my own writing, so I rely on my critique partners and beta readers to give me an honest run down of how they see the story. I’ve made a lot of changes based on feedback from both them and editors, and I truly believe it makes for a better story. I love my cps and beta readers so much, and I owe them a lot. I want to take them all away to a desert island and pamper them in thanks!

 

3.  When you’re not writing how do you spend your day?

If I’m not writing, I’m either editing, marketing, or doing something completely unrelated. I do have a job, plus a family that keeps me busy. I’m all too aware I neglect the house and the laundry in favour of my fictional characters, but I try not to neglect my kids! So if I’m not writing you might find me neck-deep in homework assignments, or driving them to soccer practice or scout meetings. And very, very occasionally, I also fit in a date night with my gorgeous husband.

 

 

Thank you to Ronnie for these questions, they were a lot of fun to answer. And now to read more Romance Weekly Blog Hop go to  http://jrrichardsonfics.wordpress.com/ and read the fabulous Jo Richardson’s answers.

Carrie Pink

 

Romance Weekly #LoveChatWrite #LoveWriteChat – 15th July

Romance Weekly ChatDo you like to read romance novels? Wouldn’t you like to know more about your favorite authors? Well you came to the right place! Join the writers of Romance Weekly as we go behind the scenes of our books and tell all….. About our writing of course! Every week we’ll answer questions and after you’ve enjoyed the blog on this site we’ll direct you to another. So come back often for a thrilling ride! Tell your friends and feel free to ask us questions in the comment box.

If you’ve arrived from Elizabeth Jannette’s blog, hi and thanks for clicking! This week’s questions are brought to you by Jo Cursed be the Wicked finalRichardson, whose amazing book Cursed be the Wicked is one of my favourite reads so far this year!

 

 

1.  How Often do you Write?

writing like crazyHonest answer? As often as I can. Sometimes this can mean daily, sometimes only a couple of times a week. I have written as much as 15,000 words in a week, and as little as nothing. I have a full time job plus a family, so writing (also known as me-time) has to fit around those.

But one day, I’ll have my own little garrett and hide away from the world. At that point, I plan to write at least 5000 words a day!

 

2.  Do you think it’s important to your craft to write as much as you can, and as often as you can?

1000 wordsI think it definitely helps. Writing is like any muscle–it works best when exercised often. However, writing doesn’t just mean writing your story. I often jot down little descriptive paragraphs that take my fancy, or write reviews of books where I can use descriptive words to really show what I liked about them.

And no, I don’t always write 1000 words a day. Sometimes a lot more, often a lot less. But it’s a good target to aspire to!


3.  What is your opinion on the saying “if you don’t write every day, you’re not a writer”?

who am i to judgeThis t-shirt says it all. Who am I to judge? If you write, you’re a writer. Whether it takes you ten years or ten days to write a book, everybody’s different. I thank God we have authors like Donna Tartt, who took around six or seven years to write The Goldfinch. On the other end of the scale, the voracious reader in me loves the fact that Elle Casey releases a book every month. Both of them are writers, but the way they do it is very different.

I guess what I’m saying is the only person I can judge is myself. Do I call myself a writer? Sometimes. But I’m also a worker, a mum, a wife, a daughter. And I love being all of these things.

 

GIVEAWAY!!

The writers of romance weekly are celebrating our 6 month anniversary with a MASSIVE rafflecopter giveaway. If you haven’t entered already, please hurry and do so. You can find the link here: ROMANCE WEEKLY RAFFLECOPTER GIVEAWAY

 

Thank you to Jo for these questions, they were a lot of fun to answer. And now to read more Romance Weekly Blog Hop go to http://www.brendamargriet.com/blog and read Brenda Magriet’s answers!

Carrie Pink

 

Romance Weekly #LoveChatWrite #LoveWriteChat – 8th July

Romance Weekly ChatDo you like to read romance novels? Wouldn’t you like to know more about your favorite authors? Well you came to the right place! Join the writers of Romance Weekly as we go behind the scenes of our books and tell all….. About our writing of course! Every week we’ll answer questions and after you’ve enjoyed the blog on this site we’ll direct you to another. So come back often for a thrilling ride! Tell your friends and feel free to ask us questions in the comment box.

If you’ve arrived from Jeanna E. Mann’s blog, hi and thanks for clicking! This week’s questiocertaintyns are brought to you by Jeanne McDonald, whose amazing new book The Certainty of Deception  will be published this week!

 

 

1.  How did you go about choosing the names for your characters?

A funny story about this. I’ve been writing ever since I was a child (Enid Blyton was my go to writer in those days. I used to dream of lazy days by the tennis court aspartacusnd midnight feasts by the pool!) And in every single one of those stories I wrote as a kid I called my heroine ‘Claire’. Why, you may ask? Simple – that was my best friend’s name, and who better to cast in every story than the person I liked the most.

Hopefully my more recent characters are slightly more sophisticated than those multitude of Claires, but that doesn’t make naming them any easier.

My go-to resource when choosing names nowadays is to look at the most popular names for the year of the character’s birth. The lists tend to have a choice of 100, which is more than enough for me.

I also take into account where they are from, the names of the supporting characters (it would be a little confusion to have an Ella and an Emma), and finally (perhaps most importantly) whether the name ‘suits’ them. It isn’t always easy as you can see!

 

2.  Where did the inspiration for your current book come from?

My current work-in-progress is set in the same ‘world’ as the book that’s due to be published in the fall of 2014. The first in the series is called ‘Coming Down’ and the second has a working title of ‘Breaking Through’.

Coming Down was only ever supposed to be a stand alone, and it certainly has no cliff hanger or unresolved story. But two supporting characters–friends of the heroine–stood out to me so much that I felt they deserved their own book. Breaking Through is about the strains that a change in direction can put on a marriage. The couple start out strong, but then they have a baby, and the band the husband has been playing in for years suddenly breaks through and becomes famous, taking him away from his family when they need him most.

Where did I get the inspiration for both these stories? I guess firstly I wanted to base a book in the part of London I love the most–the East End. Where this was once a run-down part of the city, nowadays it is up and coming. Plus there have always been the more salubrious parts–Islington springs to mind–but places like Shoreditch and Hoxton have become our equivalent of Greenwich Village in NYC.

The second reason for writing the book was that I wanted strong female characters. In both books, they are fighting against circumstances, but they get through their trials by working hard, not by leaning on a man for support all the way. That doesn’t mean there’s no romance involved–quite the contrary–but they don’t expect the men to solve all their problems.

 

3.  What methods do you use to ensure you have no plot holes (journal, storyboard, outline, editor, etc.)?

Ooh, good question. I tend to be a plotter, rather than a pantser (although I’m trying to be less anal about it) which means I can try to iron plot holes out before I even start. But this isn’t the whole story. I also revise religiously (about three or four times before anybody else even sees it), then plot holehave beta readers who comment with their thoughts. The next step in the process is sending it to my editor, and finally before I ever hit ‘publish’ I let my husband read it.

To say Mr E is anal is an understatement. He writes policies and speeches for a living and has a keen eye for holes. When I give him a galley copy of my book, it’s always given back covered with red pen. And his little comments never fail to make me laugh.

 

 

GIVEAWAY!!

The writers of romance weekly are celebrating our 6 month anniversary with a MASSIVE rafflecopter giveaway. If you haven’t entered already, please hurry and do so. You can find the link here: ROMANCE WEEKLY RAFFLECOPTER GIVEAWAY

 

Thank you to Jeanne for these questions, they were a lot of fun to answer. And now to read more Romance Weekly Blog Hop go to http://scmitchell.wordpress.com/ and read S.C. Mitchell’s answers!

Carrie Pink

 

Romance Weekly #LoveChatWrite #LoveWriteChat – 1st July

Romance Weekly ChatDo you like to read romance novels? Wouldn’t you like to know more about your favorite authors? Well you came to the right place! Join the writers of Romance Weekly as we go behind the scenes of our books and tell all….. About our writing of course! Every week we’ll answer questions and after you’ve enjoyed the blog on this site we’ll direct you to another. So come back often for a thrilling ride! Tell your friends and feel free to ask us questions in the comment box.

If you’ve arrived from Amy Jarecki‘s blog, hi and thanks for clicking! This week’s questions are brought to you by Tessa Gray

1.  Do any characters you’ve written into your books remind you of yourself? Explain which ones and why.

  • just like meI suspect there’s a little bit of me in a lot of my characters. However, even before I start writing my characters start to take on a life of their own. They grow and develop in my mind, as I think about their back stories, their motivations, their experiences. I lead a fairly boring life – married, two children, very little drama, so if my characters were just like me then the story really wouldn’t be very exciting to read. As well as that, one of the things I love about writing is the fact I can create new worlds with people who aren’t like me. It’s like playing dress up, but with words!

 

2.  Was there a teacher or mentor in your life who helped nurture your writing?

mentorThere have been so many people who have had a big influence on my life. The first person who taught me the love of reading was my mum, and from that grew a love of writing. As I started to write for publication, I found an amazing group of friends–writers, readers, editors–who have all taught me so much about the written word. It would be hard to narrow it down to just one person!

 

3.  Every author has that moment when they doubt their ability to write. When that happens to you, how do you pull yourself up by the bootstraps and continue? What do you do to inspire yourself?

true grits

We all have setbacks. You only have to read about the now-successful authors who were rejected by publisher after publisher to realise you’re not alone in this game. Becoming a writer means opening yourself up to criticism–both good and bad–and this can make you over-sensitive. So what I do is remind myself how lucky I am to be doing something I love, and even better I’m able to share it with others. Yes, there are days when I feel low and sensitive, but when that happens I either bury myself in a book (always my favourite pastime) or I remind myself that the good parts of being a writer far outweigh the bad. I’m so lucky to have great friends and readers who I love talking to, and I wouldn’t give that up for the world.

 

GIVEAWAY!!

The writers of romance weekly are celebrating our 6 month anniversary with a MASSIVE rafflecopter giveaway. If you haven’t entered already, please hurry and do so. You can find the link here: ROMANCE WEEKLY RAFFLECOPTER GIVEAWAY

 

Thank you to Kim for these questions, they really made me realize how much I love our genre. And now to read more Romance Weekly Blog Hop go to http://ronnieallennovel.com/gemini/blog-1and read Ronnie Allen’s answers!

Carrie Pink

 

Romance Weekly #LoveChatWrite #LoveWriteChat – 17th June

Romance Weekly ChatDo you like to read romance novels? Wouldn’t you like to know more about your favorite authors? Well you came to the right place! Join the writers of Romance Weekly as we go behind the scenes of our books and tell all….. About our writing of course! Every week we’ll answer questions and after you’ve enjoyed the blog on this site we’ll direct you to another. So come back often for a thrilling ride! Tell your friends and feel free to ask us questions in the comment box.

If you’ve arrived from Susan Peterson Wisnewski’s blog, hi and thanks for clicking! This week’s questions are brought to you by Jami Denise.

 

1.  When writing your novel, do you know how it’s going to end before you write, or do you write from start to finish?

There’s a lot of talk about the pros and cons of plotting and pantsing (ie, flying by flying pantsthe seat of your pants) but in reality I find I do a mixture of the two. Whenever I start a book, I have a clear idea in my head of the characters, the situation, and the main plot points. Sometimes I’ll do a chapter by chapter outline, but the more I write, the more I like to see where the characters take the story. Sometimes it will veer completely off, and they’ll surprise me (and make me go back and have to replan, dammit!)

However, if there are a number of complex plot turns, I find chapter outlines to be really useful. For Fix You, for example, the story covers 12 years, and I really needed to plan each chapter in detail. My chapter outline for that ran to three, very descriptive pages!

 

2.  How do the people you know impact your writing? Are you influenced by friends and family for your characters?

I’d like to say I have a crazy family who are constantly inspiring my work, doing unbelieveable things and generally making my writing life easier. However, as much as I love them, my family keep thwarting me by being so mundanely normal. That doesn’t meancrazy family I can’t get any inspiration from them, though. I’m always watching the way people react and interact, looking at body language and facial expressions for use in future stories. And to be honest, my family is so supportive, loving and all round amazing, I wouldn’t change a single thing about them!

 

3.  Describe the hero in your current WIP in three words.

Hot. Tattooed. Father.

stephen james

In my fevered imagination, he looks a lot like model, Stephen James! So there’s that…

 

GIVEAWAY!!

The writers of romance weekly are celebrating our 6 month anniversary with a MASSIVE rafflecopter giveaway. If you haven’t entered already, please hurry and do so. You can find the link here: ROMANCE WEEKLY RAFFLECOPTER GIVEAWAY

 

Thank you to Jami for these questions, I loved the excuse to post a bit of eye candy! And now to read more Romance Weekly Blog Hop go to http://victoriabarbour.com/blog and read Victoria Barbour’s answers!

Carrie Pink

 

Romance Weekly #LoveChatWrite #LoveWriteChat – 10th June

Romance Weekly ChatDo you like to read romance novels? Wouldn’t you like to know more about your favorite authors? Well you came to the right place! Join the writers of Romance Weekly as we go behind the scenes of our books and tell all….. About our writing of course! Every week we’ll answer questions and after you’ve enjoyed the blog on this site we’ll direct you to another. So come back often for a thrilling ride! Tell your friends and feel free to ask us questions in the comment box.

If you’ve arrived from Jo Richardson’s blog, hi and thanks for clicking! This week’s questions are brought to you by Kim Handysides.

 

1.  What’s your ideal: alpha or beta and why?

alpha

This is a tough one, and depends on the context. In real life, beta every time. My husband and I are a partnership, everything is equal. If he tried to go all alpha on me I’m afraid he’d find out the real meaning of the red room of pain! HOWEVER, I love reading about alpha males. They’re hot and exciting and make for a great story. But, like reading a fairy story, I know it’s imaginary, and can enjoy it for what it is. Pure escapism. And there’s nothing wrong with that!

 

2.  Do you have a male buddy or mate you use for confirmation or inspiration when crafting your heroes?

I guess here is where I should say my husband. But I have to say not once have I used him for inspiration. Not because he isn’t perfect (because, pshawww), but because he’s mine, not another fictional heroine’s! Instead I tend to use pictures for inspiration, layering a character onto them, one that will mesh with the heroine but has enough faults to cause friction and a sizzling plot!

 

3.  What does any hero have to do to win your heart?make laugh

Make me laugh. I’m a sucker for a man with a sense of humor. As a wise woman once told me, you can close your eyes but you can’t close your ears. Good advice, people.

 

GIVEAWAY!!

The writers of romance weekly are celebrating our 6 month anniversary with a MASSIVE rafflecopter giveaway. If you haven’t entered already, please hurry and do so. You can find the link here: ROMANCE WEEKLY RAFFLECOPTER GIVEAWAY

 

Thank you to Kim for these questions, they really made me realize how much I love our genre. And now to read more Romance Weekly Blog Hop go to http://www.spwwrites.com/blog/and read Susan Peterson Wisniewski’s answers!

Carrie Pink