My Writing Year – Looking Ahead in 2017

This is part 2 of a 2 part blog. The first part looked back at 2016 and can be found here.

2017 goals - word abstract on a napkin with a cup of coffee

 

LOOKING AHEAD TO 2017

Last week I discussed my 2016 writing year, and the exciting things that happened. As I explained, 2016 was a year of transition for me, as I moved into full-time writing, and really began to concentrate on building up a backlist of work, as well as increasing my social media presence.

I see 2017 as a chance to consolidate. I’ll not only be releasing 2 books this year (and believe me, I can’t WAIT to share more about these books with you), but I also plan to write 3 additional books. I’ve worked out that 3 books is my ‘sweet spot’ – my books tend to run to around 90,000 to 100,000 words, and along with re-writes and editing, that pretty much fills up my working year.

As you’ve probably realised from my previous posts about writing, I’m a planner. I not only like to plan my stories (even if the characters never seem to stick to the plan) but I like to plan my work, too. Maybe it’s a hangover from my time working in Human Resources — if I didn’t have a ‘to-do’ list on my desk at all times, I was lost. So even though I’m now my own boss, and I work in my home office, some good habits remain. I have a weekly diary where I plan the word count for the days, as well as any publicity, marketing or meetings I have. I also have a year planner — one aimed at entrepreneurs where I plan out all the books I want to write, when I’m planning to release them, and what marketing and publicity I’ll be using to promote them. By writing them out at the start of the year, I’ll be able to measure myself against my targets and see if I reach them or not. Essentially, at the end of 2017 I’ll be giving myself a thorough going over, and deciding if I’ve been a good girl!

So, for those of you that are interested, here are my plans in all their glory.

JANUARY

So we’re two thirds of the way through January already, but that doesn’t mean I’ve been sitting on my coat tails. I had two major projects this month. The first was to complete the line edits of the first in my new Shakespeare Sisters series. The second was to begin writing the third book in the series, with a target of 40,000 words. So far I’m on track – the edits are complete, and the words are beginning to appear on the page. I’m 25,000 in, and hope to make it to the 40,000 goal by the time the month is out!

FEBRUARY

In February I’ll continue to write the third book in the Shakespeare Sisters series. At some point that month I’ll also need to check the copy edits for A Summer’s Lease (due for release in July). On a personal note, I plan to take a week off at half term to spend some time with the family — we’ll be visiting Dublin for a week. I haven’t been to Dublin since 1996, so I’m really excited to go back and see the beautiful city!

MARCH

March is the most exciting month of the year in the UK publishing world — the London Book Fair takes place from the 14th to 16th. Though it’s more of a meeting place for Agents and publishers, I’ll be heading up there at some point to soak in the atmosphere and meet some old friends. I also plan to finish the first draft of book 3, as well as complete any proofreading of A Summer’s Lease. By March I’m also hoping I’ll be able to share the cover reveal for A Summer’s Lease. Fingers crossed it all goes to plan!

APRIL

Oh to be in England now that April’s here. And luckily for me, that’s exactly where I’ll be. April will see me doing the re-writes for The Winter’s Tale the second in the Shakespeare Sisters series, due for release in November 2017. I’ll plan on taking a few days off around Easter, but apart from that it’s all systems go!

MAY

In May I’ll be finishing up The Winter’s Tale, and submitting it to my publishers ready for November. Once that’s finished, I’ll be going back in to edit the book I wrote in January and February, plus I’ll be working on the marketing plans for A Summer’s Lease.

JUNE

June will almost certainly be my busiest month. I’ll be starting a new book this month, a super secret project that I’m really excited about. I’ll also be attending my first signing of the year — The Dedicated Ink Book Signing event in Newcastle, England. I expect at this point to receive the developmental edits for The Winter’s Tale, which will see me trying to spin a few different plates. Hopefully nothing will get smashed!

JULY

I said that June will be busy, and I expect July to be a close run thing. July 7th will see the release of A Summer’s Lease, and I’ll be spending a lot of time in person and online promoting it. I’ll also be continuing to write the super secret project, as well as hopefully spending some time with my family, and taking advantage of what little summer we might get here in the UK!

AUGUST

As a mum and a wife, I try to cut back on the work in August. We usually take a two week vacation during this month, plus the children will be on a break from school, and I always look forward to spending time with them. If I haven’t already finished the super secret project in July, I’ll finish it in August, plus I’ll continue the publicity for A Summer’s Lease. At the very end of August is my second event of the year. ChapterCon takes place on 25th and 26th August, and I’ll be sitting on a panel here, as well as signing and attending

SEPTEMBER

In a strange way, September always feels a little like January to me. A beginning of a year (of the school year at least) and a chance to throw myself back into work. Any residual edits from The Winter’s Tale will need to be done this month, plus planning for the November release. I also intend to start my final book of the year in September. The second book in my super secret project, of which more details soon!

OCTOBER

It feel strange to be planning so far in advance, but if you’re still with me, we’re almost there. October will see me writing book 2 in the new secret project, plus any final changes for The Winter’s Tale. After that, my thoughts will start to turn to my 2018 publishing plans, which include the final 2 books in the Shakespeare Sisters series.

NOVEMBER

Ah, just writing that word makes me think of bonfires and falling leaves. It seems a world away from this chilly January morning. By this point I’m hoping to have finished or be finishing my third book of the year, which will leave the rest of the month for any developmental edits for the third in my Shakespeare Sisters series. November also sees the release of book 2 in the series, and I’ll be planning lots of fun and games to celebrate!

DECEMBER

And so we come full circle. December will see the end of another year, and hopefully it will be a successful one. As with most Decembers, I won’t plan to be doing too much writing this month, not least because I’m Christmas Crazy and I’ll be wanting to spend my time cooking, decorating and celebrating! In December I’ll also be looking back to review 2017, as well as making plans for 2018. It seems strange typing that now, but from experience I know that time will fly, and no doubt I’ll be back here talking about whether I achieved all my goals!

Wow! I’m exhausted just typing that. If you’ve stayed with me, well done – you deserve a cup of tea or something stronger. It looks like my 2017 is going to be just as crazy as 2016, but I can’t wait. I feel very blessed indeed to have the chance to write for a living, and am grateful for all the support I’ve had from my lovely readers, publishers, agents and author friends.

 

Until next time,

Carrie Pink

 

 

Photo Credit: Depositphotos

My Writing Year – 2016 In Review

This is part 1 in a 2 part blog. The first part is looking back at 2016. The second will be discussing my plans for 2017.

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Happy New Year!

Better late than never, right? I hope you had a great holiday season. I took a bit of time off to spend with my family, and to catch up on my over-stuffed to-be-read list. And boy are there some great books out there right now.

January has always been a time of self-reflection for me. A chance to take stock of the year before, and then to turn my eyes onto my goals for the next 12 months. This year has been no different. So I thought I’d share my highlights from the past year, and my plans for 2017. Hopefully by writing them down, I’ll have to hold myself to them!

2016 IN REVIEW

Last year was all kinds of win for me. In February Corvus released Fix You in paperback, and I finally got to see one of my books on a shelf in a shop. On Facebook my friends were sharing pictures of them finding it in grocery stores and bookshops, and every image made my day. It’s the kind of things writers dream about.

Then in April I released the third book in my Love in London series. Canada Square was my first new release since I became a full-time writer (although it was written before I went full time). It was a milestone in all kinds of ways, rounding off the series, and letting me share the lives of Beth, Lara and Amy a final time. (Not that it was the final time – read on for more!). As with the other Love in London books, the release went well, although it didn’t light up the sky. Let’s hope this series is a slow burner!

April also saw my first visit as a writer to Germany, at the Love Letter Comvention in Berlin. It was amazing to spend time with so many avid romance readers, and the welcome I received was so warm. I was only there for three days, which really isn’t enough time to soak up everything the beautiful city has to offer, but I will be back!

In April I also finished the first draft of a new book in a new series. A Summer’s Lease (The Shakespeare Sisters book 1) was my first fully-written book as a full time author, and marked a turning point for me. When I sent it off to my agent, I was nervous as hell. Luckily, she fell in love with Sam and Cesca as much as I did.

June and July saw the publication of Fix You (or Kiss You!) by Ullstein in Germany. These wonderful months also saw me sell the rights to the four Shakespeare Sisters stories to Piatkus (Little Brown). A very exciting piece of news for me.

I took August off to spend time with my teenagers. It was a calculated risk — August is traditionally a quiet time in the publishing industry, plus I’d finished writing a (mystery) book at the end of July, so I felt I could spare the time. As my children get older I’m realising that they’ll soon be leaving the nest and flying away, so I’ve decided to enjoy the time I have left with them.

September saw me writing the second book in the Shakespeare Sisters series. By Virtue Fall tells the story of Juliet, the second of the Shakespeare sisters. I managed to finish writing this one by November 2016.

In November, I attended a wonderful writing retreat, hosted by the fabulous Urban Writers’ Retreats. It’s my second time to this location, an isolated farmhouse in the hills of Devon, and I have to say I LOVED it. I went with a firm plan, because by that time I was juggling multiple projects.

In the mornings, I allowed my creative muse to take flight, and wrote a short story, based on the characters in the Love in London series (so Canada Square wasn’t my last encounter with them, after all!) In the afternoons I was carrying out developmental edits, as agree with my editor at Piatkus. This was the first of two rounds of dev edits. Evenings (after dinner and a few drinks) were dedicated to proof-reading the US version of Fix You, which I was due to release in December. Somehow having 3 very separate projects allowed me to be very disciplined with my time, and I went home having achieved everything I wanted to.

November also saw the release of the Love in London series in Germany. I was beyond excited to see these stories translated, and to get so many lovely reviews and comments from my German readers, and can’t wait to share more stories with you all.

December saw the release of Fix You in the US and Canada. Traditionally this is a bad month to release books, and combined with the fact that Fix You had already been released in the UK and in numerous foreign translations, I wasn’t expecting the world from this release. However, I was pleasantly surprised by the reception and how well it’s sold. It’s always fun to introduce Richard and Hanna’s story to new readers, and it was a great month to do that. I also completed the second round of developmental edits to A Summer’s Lease, and agreed a release date of July 7th 2017. I’m so excited to be publishing a new series this year.

Looking back, 2016 was a year of changes for me. I think it’s the first year I’ve really treated writing as my job, which I guess isn’t a surprise, since until last year I was combining it with my day job. It was also a year of consolidation for me — finishing one series, and beginning another, while trying to build my brand recognition. Having written everything down, I feel as if I achieved so much more than I set out to, but still have much more to do in order to reach my long-term goals. I wrote around 320,000 words, published 3 books (a bit of a cheat – one was a box set!), and sold a 4 book series to a publisher. Let’s see if I can beat that in 2017!

So that’s my 2016 in a nutshell. Join me next week to find out my goals and plans for 2017!

Carrie Pink

 

 

Photo Credit: Depositphotos

Fix You – The Ideas Behind The Book

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Only 5 days until FIX YOU releases in the US and Canada! Today I’m sharing some insights into what inspired the book, and whether there is ANY resemblance between me and Hanna (apart from the fact we’re both in love with Richard!)

What inspired you to write Fix You?

Every new year the family and I travel to the Cotswolds to spend a couple of days with friends in a beautiful cottage. In 2012 we were drinking champagne on New Year’s Eve and reminiscing about the millennium. That conversation led on to how things have changed (the rise of the internet, 9/11, social media etc) and it planted a little seed in my mind. From that seed grew Richard and Hanna’s story, a relationship that spanned a decade that has seen enormous change, and the rest is history—their history!

Are there any parts of the novel that have special personal significance to you? Have you ever been in a long-distance relationship?

I met my (now) husband at university (Nottingham—the one that Hanna attends) and in the *cough* few years that we’ve been together, we’ve had our fair share of travels and working in different parts of the country. In our twenties we spent two years apart which had its ups (I could watch Pride and Prejudice on TV without him moaning) and downs (frozen meals for one). This was back in the day before Facebook, texting and cheap phone calls. We even wrote each other letters. By the way, whatever happened to love letters? Sigh.

I think the other thing that I really enjoyed writing about was New York. I’ve had a love affair with that city since the first time I visited when I was 21. Since then I’ve been back about ten times, and still can’t get enough of it. Although at the start of the story Hanna really doesn’t enjoy travelling to see her father in Manhattan, I really enjoyed writing about the sights and sounds of the city

You have lots of details about world events and things happening at the time the book is set. Was it important to you that these were accurate?

I did a lot of research when writing the book. Some of it was really hard to read, such as survivors’ recollections of the aftermath of 9/11, but other parts were more light-hearted and fun. I drove my family mad with all the snippets of information I found (“Hey, remember when mobile phones used to look like bricks!”), but to me they were golden. One of my favourites was when I discovered that The Strokes were playing in the Mercury Lounge at the same time Hanna was visiting Richard in New York. I hadn’t planned it, but as soon as I read that, I knew it was meant to be.

Music features heavily in Fix You. Are you a music lover? How did you choose which songs and bands to include in the novel?

I have a big love of music, mostly thanks to my husband, who considers himself a bit of a muso. Pretty much every song in Fix You is on my iPod, and I played them incessantly when I was writing the book. My tastes aren’t quite as eclectic as Richard’s (I don’t run the gamut from the Prodigy to Puccini), but between my husband and me, we have around 800 albums.

I think my favourite bit about music in the book is where Hanna tries to explain to her mum about a band she’s been listening to. Although I don’t mention the band’s name, the fact they lose a grand and eventually find it behind the TV should be enough pointers to work out who I based it on. If you can’t guess, tweet me. I might give you some clues.

Do you have a favourite character in the novel? Are there any similarities between you and Hanna?

It’s a bit obvious, but I fell in love with Richard while I was writing the book. Between 1999 and 2012 we watch him grow up to be a strong, good man who does his best to keep everybody happy. He’s alpha without needing to dominate, and strong without needing to boast about it. My kind of guy!

As for Hanna, apart from the fact we’re brunettes and went to university in Nottingham, I don’t think there are many similarities between her and me. She’s a lot more impulsive than I am, and can be prone to making questionable decisions, but she’s also kind and loveable. While she’s not based on me, she’s definitely somebody I’d like to have as a friend. I think she’d liven up any party!

What was the biggest challenge of writing the novel?

As with many authors, it was probably time. I work, have a family, and am almost certainly the world’s greatest procrastinator. When the internet is on, I have the attention span of Dory in Finding Nemo. I find I have to switch off the router, make myself a vat full of coffee and hide in my bedroom with my laptop if I want to get anything done.

The other difficult thing was editing my original manuscript. It started out at a whopping 140,000 words (almost two books’ worth), and deciding what to keep and what to take out was very tricky. I hope I got it right!

Which romance authors do you most admire?

This is a hard question, mostly because I can read anything up to 3 books a week, so I tend to have a lot of favourite authors. In fact, I’ve just browsed through my kindle and it currently has 698 books on there, which is scary, not to mention expensive!

There are a few writers who are my ‘must reads’ anytime they bring out a book. They include Marian Keyes, Mhairi MacFarlane and Samantha Young. All of them manage to combine an emotional, compelling story with a lightness of writing and humour that is a joy to read. I love stories that have flawed characters who go on a journey toward self-discovery, and these three give me that in spades!

fix-you-teaser-6Pre-Order Fix You at these stores:

Kindle US  |  Kindle CA |  Nook  |  iBooks

Coming Soon: Google Play  |  Kobo  |  Kindle CA

Also available to buy here: Kindle UK  |  Kindle AU

Fix You – A Few Questions Answered!

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With the US & Canada Release of Fix You only 12 days away, I thought it would be fun to share a Q&A about Richard and Hanna with you! Read on to find out more about the book, characters, and what’s coming up for me in 2017!

 

Tell us about “Fix You”.

Fix You tells the story of Richard and Hanna. They first meet on 31st December 1999 when he’s an American student visiting his father in London, and she’s a Brit who is being paid to work at his parent’s New Year’s Eve party. Over the next 12 years their connection grows, leading to an explosive revelation in his Manhattan office when she reveals a big secret. The story is set against a backdrop of real-life events that took place over these years, with lots of pop culture references, taking readers on a journey of twists and turns!

 

What inspired you to write the story spanning such a wide timespan?

I wanted to write a modern story, but to somehow incorporate the type of book I loved growing up, which tended to follow characters over a number of years. Fix You was my attempt to mesh the two! The beauty of a longer timespan is that you can really explore how relationships change as people grow up and mature, and I think we get to see this with Richard and Hanna.

 

How did you decide the different times and paths for the characters?

Before writing I did a lot of research, because even though this is recent history it’s amazing how much I’d forgotten. Once I’d researched each year, and knew the events, technology and music that were key, I drew out a very long timeline. The next bit was easy; by this point Richard and Hanna were very much fleshed-out characters in my mind and combining their traits with the events that took place meant they more or less decided the storyline for themselves.

 

Did you find it hard writing as both Hanna and Richard throughout the book?

No, I loved writing both their points of view. They are very different characters—Hanna is impulsive and emotional, whereas Richard tends to be more reasoned and traditional—yet there’s aspects of both of them that I really enjoy. To paraphrase Jerry Maguire, they ‘complete each other’. It just takes them a while to realise this!

 

Did you go into writing the book wanting to explore a particular theme?

When I first started writing Fix You there were a few things I wanted to explore, but the first thing I wanted to do was write a prologue that really grabbed the reader. From the beginning, we learn what Hanna’s secret is, but we don’t know why or when it happened, or what the fall-out will be. It’s this mystery (I hope) that keeps the reader going through the story, in spite of the ups and downs that Hanna and Richard experience.

 

What were you doing on New Year’s Eve 1999?

I was lying in bed with a new-born baby, so I managed to miss out on most of the celebrations! I did manage to wake up for midnight, so I saw the millennium in, but I definitely wasn’t out partying like Richard and Hanna were!

 

 What are you working on now?

I’m currently working on a new series called ‘The Shakespeare Sisters’. It follows four British girls who are looking for love. The first book in the series, Summer’s Lease, will be released in July 2017.

 

How did you get into writing?

I’ve been writing since I was a child, but never really managed to finish a project until I reached my thirties. I think the reason for this is that I discovered an online community of writers and readers who provided me with a lot of support. Once I started writing regularly I found I couldn’t stop.

 

What’s the best feedback you’ve had?

“I couldn’t put this down.” I’m not sure there’s much that tops that!

 

What advice do you have for anyone wanting to write a book?

Write it! It sounds easy (and it isn’t) but unless you get the words down on the page you’re never going to get there. It took me a good ten years to complete a project, then less than a year to write my second, so when you’ve done it once (and accepted that you CAN do it) everything gets a lot easier. I’d also advise any new writer to find a community of writers where you can work together, critique each other’s writing, and also provide each other support on the bad days. I wouldn’t be here without my online friends, and I’m very thankful for them.

 

fix-you-teaser-2Pre-Order Fix You at these stores:

Kindle US  | Kindle CA |  Nook  |  iBooks

 

Also available to buy here: Kindle UK  |  Kindle AU

 

On Imposter Syndrome

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Recently I’ve been trying to improve my health. Simple steps like drinking less wine, and trying to walk 10,000 steps a day. It’s amazing how having a sedentary job can help pile on the pounds, and I’m hoping that a few tweaks here and there will counter the sitting around all day! Anyway, as part of my plan, I’ve started to listen to writing podcasts as I walk. Most of them last for around an hour, which is enough time for me to get in around 8,000 steps (I do the final 2000 steps at night).

This week I listened to Joanna Penn’s latest podcast about creating a successful author mindset. She gives a lot of great tips, which I won’t repeat here, but if you’re a writer and suffer from doubt, prevarication, or any of the other things that actually stop us from getting the words on the page, I urge you to give her podcast a listen.

Anyway, one thing that really struck me in her podcast was when she mentioned Imposter Syndrome. Her brief allusion to the way that success can make you feel like a failure really struck a chord with me, and made me want to learn more.

According to Wikipedia (and I don’t have to repeat that Wiki isn’t always the best source for information, but I will anyway!) the term Imposter Syndrome was was coined in 1978 by psychologists Dr. Pauline R. Clance and Suzanne A. Imes. In essence it refers to a state of mind where you’ve achieved something, but have failed to internalise the achievement. Instead, you tend to think you’re a fraud and that you didn’t deserve the success.

Looking back, I can see a number of times I’ve suffered from something similar to this, and it explains a lot about my mindset. Not just in writing, but also in other aspects of my life. And though I’m no doctor, it may well explain some of these experiences I’ve had.

The first time I can really remember feeling this way was back when I was ten years old. I was learning to play the clarinet (though I was never very good) and I had to go through an audition to attend a music school on a Saturday morning. Long story short, I passed, but one of my friends who was better than me didn’t. My first thought — they’ve got us mixed up, and as soon as I arrive at school they’ll tell me there’s a problem and send me home.

Of course they didn’t tell me that. And quite honestly, I wasn’t much of a success at the clarinet either. Suffice to say I left a couple of years later and never played the clarinet again!

In more recent times, being a published author has brought some of these feelings to the surface once more. When people ask me how I managed to get where I am, I tend to tell them I was in the right place at the right time. Not that I wrote a good book, or that it was worthy of getting published, but that I was lucky.

The problem is, if you think you’ve been lucky, what happens when your luck runs out? In the mind of somebody suffering from Imposter Syndrome, that’s when they get ‘found out’. People will suddenly realise the Emperor is wearing no clothes and laugh at them. And even though I have an agent, a book published in six different languages, and another four contracted for publication from 2017, I still feel that way.

According to Wiki, Imposter Syndrome is particularly found among high achievers, and though it’s prevalent in both genders, women are more willing to own up to it than men. I know from speaking with many of my writer friends that I’m not alone in feeling this way, as I wonder if the next book is the one where people will realise I’m a fraud. The saddest part is that it stops us from enjoying our successes, because they’re always tempered with a fear that they cannot continue.

So what do we do if we suffer from Imposter Syndrome? This article from Psychology Today suggests we go public about it (hence this post). It also suggests that a certain level of impostership is healthy, as it helps us remain humble. This article from the Shriver Report suggests 10 ways to battle these feelings, including internalising the external validation, talking to like-minded people, and taking stock of your success. In all the articles I’ve read, what comes through is that by talking about it, we lessen the effect of what we’re going through. As with so many mind-based issues, suffering in silence is the worst thing we can do.

So today I’m going to go and look at my books and hold them in my hand and tell myself that I made these. They have some wonderful reviews (as well as a few one stars) but each time somebody contacts me to tell me they loved them, I need to realise they’re talking about my words making a difference in their lives.

How about you — does any of this ring true for you? What do you plan to do today to make yourself realise that, in the words of Aibileen in The Help (Kathryn Stockett) “You is kind, you is smart, you is important”?

 

Carrie Pink

Cover Reveal – Canada Square

COVER REVEAL

Today I’m delighted to share with you the cover for my next release. Canada Square is the third in the Love in London Series, but like the rest of the books can be read as a standalone novel. Scroll down for the blurb and excerpt, and don’t forget to add to your Goodreads page! The book will be released on April 7th, and I’ll be sharing lots of teasers and excerpts on my Facebook page, so drop on by and say hello!

And if you would like to receive an email when the pre-order is live, please click here

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Title: Canada Square
Series: Love in London #3
Author: Carrie Elks
Genre: Adult Romance
Release Date: April 7th, 2016
Cover Designed by: Sylvia Frost

SYNOPSIS

Secrets have a way of coming out…

Amy Cartwright isn’t sure who she’s supposed to be anymore. Her family thinks she’s flighty, her ex believes she’s a walkover (the bastard) and her friends think she’s plain crazy. But there’s a different side to her that nobody sees, nobody but the cool, sexy Scotsman who just happens to be her boss.

Callum Ferguson isn’t looking for excitement; he’s had that and it almost ruined him. He likes things calm and predictable – everything that his new PA turns out not to be. But from the moment she walks through his office door it’s as though the light has come back into his life, and he can’t get her out of his mind.

Fighting against the inevitable, they both try to ignore the attraction, but the flame of desire is too bright. They’re soon drawn into a steamy love affair that they have to hide from everybody, knowing the revelation could cost them everything they’ve worked so hard for, including each other.

Author note: Canada Square is the third in the Love in London series, but can be read as a standalone book.

Goodreads Button

EXCERPT

“I’m the youngest of three. Nothing’s ever just about me.”

He blinks slowly, eyes heavy lidded. “Something should be.”

The moment twists, the humour dissolving in the frisson that grows between us. I feel it crackling and buzzing against my skin, and all I can think about is that kiss.

Soft, sure. A brief moment of everything.

“Something?” I ask, a little breathlessly.

He catches my gaze, holding it without trying. In that instant I know for sure that whatever I’m feeling for him isn’t one-sided. It weaves between us, soft as silk, unbreakable as iron. It makes me feel delighted and downright scared. I can cope with a crush, enjoy it even. Treat him like the eye-candy he is, a piece of deliciousness to look forward to when I enter the office. But mutual attraction? That’s dangerous. It’s a lingering force that threatens everything; my job, my degree, my hopes for the future.

Here be dragons, but rather than run away from the flames, I’m letting them consume me.

IN THE SERIES

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Carrie Elks Headshot

Carrie Elks lives near London, England and writes contemporary romance with a dash of intrigue. At the age of twenty-one she left college with a political science degree, a healthy overdraft and a soon-to-be husband. She loves to travel and meet new people, and has lived in the USA and Switzerland as well as the UK. An avid social networker, she tries to limit her Facebook and Twitter time to stolen moments between writing chapters. When she isn’t reading or writing, she can usually be found baking, drinking wine or working out how to combine the two.

My Week in Pictures

Hello! Hope you’re all doing well. As you may know, Fix You was released in paperback in the UK this week, and I thought I’d do a quick post to show you what publication week looked like to me. And because a picture says a thousand words, I thought I’d let my camera do the talking…

 

1. Publication day – I wake up to find the living room full of Fix Yous!!

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2. A box of paperbacks arrive – I *may* have kissed every one of them.

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3. Here’s me looking kind of dorky

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4. Then Heat magazine featured Fix You in their Valentine’s Day special

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5. I was interviewed on BBC Essex to talk about the book

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6. I also had my last day at work this week. I’ve left to concentrate on writing full-time. Yay!

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7. And this is what I’ll be doing to celebrate on Friday night!

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So that’s my week in a nutshell. Fix You is now available to buy in store at Tesco, Asda and WH Smith travel, and online in ebook at all good web stores.
And if you want to listen to my interview – here’s the link. I come in about halfway through the podcast (at around 2:10)
Have a great week,

Carrie Pink