Giving it Up #LoveChatWrite Blog Hop

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Welcome to this week’s Romance Writer’s Weekly Blog Hop. If you’ve arrived from S.C. Mitchell’s blog, hi, and thanks for joining me!

This week we’re talking about giving things up. If we had to give up something, what would it be, and how would we handle it?

You only have to follow me on Instagram or Twitter to know how much I love a glass of wine (or two!) When my children were younger, and after they were in bed, pouring a small glass of white would be my signal that my working day was over and I could put my feet up and relax for a moment — at least until it was time to make their school lunches, tidy the kitchen, and get everything ready for the next day.

Nowadays my children go to bed after I do. I still love a glass of wine, though, especially on a Friday night. And if that glass somehow expands into  bottle (between the two of us, because I’m not that bad…) then so be it. It’s my favourite indulgence, and it tastes blooming good, plus it’s the perfect accompaniment to some good company (thanks Mr. Elks) and a good movie or TV programme.

So if I had to give up something, then wine would be it. And I know I’d find it hard. In fact, only last night Mr. E and I were talking about giving wine up for October. A whole month without wine? How would we last?

And then we remembered that we’re going out for dinner on October 7th. Plus we’re going away for a few nights on October 22nd. Neither of these things can happen without a glass or two of the best stuff. So in actuality, we’re giving up wine from 8th to the 21st October. We can’t even manage 3 weeks.

Because we are bad.

There you have it. If I had to give up something it would be wine. Except I can’t give it up because I like it too much and it makes me happy. Which, if you think about it, isn’t too much to ask for, is it?

 

Now let’s hop over to Brenda Margriet’s blog to find out what she’s planning on giving up! While you’re there take a look at her fabulous book, When Time Falls Still.

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Until next time,

Carrie Pink

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Photo credits: Canva & authors own.

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My Writing-Free Week

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Last Monday, I managed to type the most beautiful two words that an author can write; ‘The End’. Though I was sad to say goodbye (at least until I begin the edits) to the lovely world I’d created, and the characters I’d come to care about, I have to admit the feeling of accomplishment was fantastic.

But then what?

You see, in my mind I was going to type those words on Friday, leading into a weekend of rest before I got going on another project. But instead I’d been typing so fast and so hard, and the characters had been demanding so much of my time that I finished way ahead of schedule. Which left me with four days to fill. I didn’t want to jump straight into my next project (editing another book) because I needed time to let this story go. Time to pull myself out of their world and back into my own one. Time to take a breath and step back.

So I decided to spend the week adulting.

Yes, I know, very unlike me. But there was a lot of stuff I’d been putting off, and I really had no excuse not to do it any more. Plus there were the pleasant things too – you know, having coffee with friends who’d all but forgotten I existed, actually talking to my teenagers when they got home from school, and *gasp* even cooking food that didn’t come in a shrink wrapped tray. So for four days I was a bone fide fully-fleshed adult.

I even enjoyed it!

On Tuesday I spent the day cleaning the house. And I mean CLEANING. Not my usual swipe of a cloth until it looks surface clean (sorry Mum), but proper deep cleaning that made everything sparkle and shine. The sort of clean that makes everybody ask me if I’ve done ‘something’ to the house (nope) or if I’ve had a clear out (yep). So that was good.

Then on Wednesday morning I sorted out my clothes. I packed away my summer clothes and brought out the sweaters and stockings and furry socks. I even tidied up my closet and my drawers, and of course I discovered clothes I’d forgotten I had. In all it was very satisfying. I rewarded myself that afternoon by spending time with my sister-in-law and her very gorgeous new baby.

On Thursday I had coffee with another sister-in-law and our friend (I sense a theme here), followed by cleaning out the oven (bleurgh) and then chopping back all the overgrown bushes in the garden. We have a hundred-foot plus backyard, which can defeat me at the best of times, so actually getting things done was pretty satisfying.

Then on Friday I read.

Yep, I read.

I sat down with my kindle and a cup of coffee and didn’t move off my butt. And it was goooood.

Reading is one of my favourite occupations, and yet the first thing that I lose out on when I’m writing a new book. So for the three months that I’m typing away, I buy books and stockpile them, waiting for the moment to arrive that I can finally download them and veg out on my sofa. That moment was Friday and it was amazing.

By the weekend I was feeling antsy, so I started to sit down and plan some writing-related things. Marketing plans, teasers, release dates and signings.

Oh, and I met with my accountant to agree my tax return. Which doesn’t sound like much fun, but my accountant is lovely and funny and always makes me laugh (through my tears). So there was that.

I’m back to work today, but I’m glad I had a few days to spend doing the things I’ve been avoiding for months. Adulting is hard, but it’s also rewarding, and stops my family from throwing me out. All good things.

Have a good week!

Carrie Pink

 

When Writing is In-Tense… #LoveChatWrite Blog Hop

Woman writing on notepad in coffee shop, stock photo

Welcome to this week’s Romance Writer’s Weekly Blog Hop. If you’ve arrived from Lyra Parish’s blog, thanks for joining me!

This week we’re talking about craft. How we decide what tense and point of view to use, and whether we have written a book that breaks all the rules.

I never used to notice tense or point of view until I became a writer. As a reader I didn’t care less about the mechanics of the writing, as long as it was a good story, with good characters, and a plot that kept me hooked. Any more information than that, and it was like looking behind the Wizard of Oz’s curtain, and discovering how mundane the crafting of a story can be. But when I started writing stories, my eyes were opened to how many choices a writer has to make about how their story is formed, and how these choices can influence the reader’s perception. As Stephen King so wisely said in his memoir, ‘On Writing’, “you must not come lightly to the blank page.”

When I first started reading romance books (just after papyrus was invented), many of them shared the same basic framework — written in third person, with both the hero and heroine’s point of view, and always in the past tense. Of course the occasional book would be written in first person, but often those would veer more into the Women’s Fiction genre, with more emphasis on the heroine’s journey, and less on her budding romance with the hero.

Nowadays, though, there are so many choices in how to approach the story. There are books in first or third person, in present or past tense, and the choice of whether to show one or both points of view can depend upon the story. I love the diversity this offers both reader and writer, and I myself have written in different styles. Fix You is more traditional, written in third-person past, with both Richard and Hanna’s point of view. The three books in the Love in London series are different — they’re written in first person present, giving an immediacy to the heroine’s journey, and a more intimate viewpoint of the budding romance between her and the hero.

When I wrote fan fiction, I liked to push the boundaries, and have written in third person present (not a combination you see in books very often) and even had an attempt in writing in second-person present. For those who haven’t had the joy of second-person, take a look here. All I can say is that by the time I’d finished writing, it somehow morphed into first person. Probably a good thing not many books are written in second!

While I don’t really have a preference on tense or viewpoint, recently I’ve found myself veering more into third person than first. For some reason I’ve found it suits the story better, and allows me to give a fullness and weight to the plot that first person wouldn’t allow. I know some people say that third person is more shallow and less emotional than writing in first person, but I think that you can still fill a scene with feeling and depth regardless of the point of view. You just need to use the right words in the right order — it’s that easy, and that hard!

How about you? Do you have any preferences for tense and point of view when you’re reading (or writing a book). Let me knowing the comments.

Now let’s hop over to Jenna Da Sie’s Blog to find out how she deals with tense and pov.

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Until next time,

Carrie Pink

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Photo credits: Depositphotos & authors own.