Romance Weekly #LoveChatWrite #LoveWriteChat – 26th May 2015

Romance Weekly ChatDo you like to read romance novels? Wouldn’t you like to know more about your favorite authors? Well you came to the right place! Join the writers of Romance Weekly as we go behind the scenes of our books and tell all….. About our writing of course! Every week we’ll answer questions and after you’ve enjoyed the blog on this site we’ll direct you to another. So come back often for a thrilling ride! Tell your friends and feel free to ask us questions in the comment box.

If you’ve arrived from Kate Robbins’ Blog, hi and thanks for clicking!

 This week Jeanne McDonald has asked us to answer some questions about how it feels to be an author.

1. Describe the moment you first felt like a true author, not an aspiring one.

2-am-I-really-published-293x300I think it has to be when Fix You was published. About a month before the publication I was interviewed on my local radio station, which was a lot of fun, and then I was interviewed for my local paper. For the first time I was getting messages from people who had read the book and lived it, and was also seeing the book hit the bestseller list on both Amazon and the iBookstore. It was then that I realised there were lots of people out there buying my book and it felt magical!

2. Name 3 authors who inspire you.

Marian Author Photo small

Marian Keyes

The first is Marian Keyes. I loved her writing since I first read her book, Watermelon, back in the 90s. Her stories are well written and a lot of fun to read, but they don’t shy away from addressing issues such as addiction, marriage problems and even the loss of loved ones. As a person with a platform, Marian also speaks out in support of those with mental health issues, which she does amazingly well. She suffers from depression and her openness and willingness to share her own experiences has taken away some of the stigma this disease carries.

replica by FranÁois D'Albert Durade, oil on canvas, (1849)

The second author I’m inspired by is George Eliot. A woman who wrote books at a time when mostly men were published, she nevertheless managed to find a way around this, by using a man’s name as her pseudonym. In an era when women were only supposed to write light-hearted romances, Eliot addressed political and philosophical questions in her fictions, and was described as among the greatest western writers of all time.

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Daphne Du Maurier

Daphne Du Maurier is my third choice. The opening pages to Rebecca—where she describes a dream about a long-abandoned Manderley—is one of the most beautifully written passages I have read. Evocative and forbidding, she manages to foreshadow the psychologically disturbing plot of the book with a few carefully chosen words.

3. Describe your favourite fan moment.

1402902084_500Some of my favourite memories of the past year have been the lovely messages I have received from Brazilian readers. They are always so lovely and enthusiastic, and with the help of Google translate I’ve managed to have some lively conversations about my book!

Thanks to Jeanne for asking some fun questions. Now let’s hop over to Collette Cameron’s blog and read her answers! 

Romance Weekly #LoveChatWrite #LoveWriteChat – 12th May 2015

Romance Weekly ChatDo you like to read romance novels? Wouldn’t you like to know more about your favorite authors? Well you came to the right place! Join the writers of Romance Weekly as we go behind the scenes of our books and tell all….. About our writing of course! Every week we’ll answer questions and after you’ve enjoyed the blog on this site we’ll direct you to another. So come back often for a thrilling ride! Tell your friends and feel free to ask us questions in the comment box.
If you’ve arrived from Elizabeth Jannette’s Blog, hi and thanks for clicking!

 

 This week Xio Axelrod has asked us to answer our questions on behalf of one of our characters.

So for this, I choose Richard Larsen, the gorgeous hero of Fix You, and Sempre Foi Voce

 

image                    Capa Sempre foi voce

 

1. What’s your favourite word?

Well that’s easy. Hanna, obviously. When I fall asleep every night that’s the name on my lips.

2. What is your fondest childhood memory?

When I was five my dad bought me a sailing boat. Not a full size one, obviously, but a toy one. We used to set it off in the lake beside our summer home. One day it got caught by a gust of wind and carried out into the middle of the lake. Without even thinking, my dad stripped off, dove into the water and swam out to save my toy. That’s my favorite memory.

3. What one thing in your past do you wish you could do differently?

I wish I hadn’t let Hanna leave, we wasted too much time, too many years. Oh, and I wish I’d invented Facebook!

4. Vanilla or Chocolate?

Wait… are we talking about milkshakes or sex? Ah well, let’s go for chocolate anyway.

5. If you could have lunch with one famous person (alive or not) who would it be and why?

Babe Ruth, because the Yankees rule and don’t try to tell me otherwise.

 

Thanks Richard! Now let’s hop over to Susan Scott Shelley’s blog and see where her character wants to take us. 

Why I Love Love

This piece on romance and love was originally published on Blinkbox in December 2014. After the sad demise of that venerable site, I thought it was a shame to lose these words forever.

Why I Love Love by Carrie Elks

original

I’m a romance junkie. There, I’ve said it. I adore reading stories where love overcomes all the obstacles, spanning time and distance, and bringing together couples who – at first sight – seem to have nothing in common at all.
In my new novel, Fix You, Hanna Vincent falls in love with a man who not only lives thousands of miles away from her, but is also on another level when it comes to social status. Though the odds are stacked against them (not to mention the plot twists) over a period of years she is drawn against her will to the handsome, successful American who has captured her heart.
Theirs is a relationship that shouldn’t work, and in fact it doesn’t for a long time. Hanna has a job and a life in London, while Richard is tied to New York by a combination of loyalty and dedication, not to mention a multi-million dollar corporation that takes up all of his time. From a purely intellectual point of view they should both cut their losses.
Of course they don’t, and that’s the beauty of love. It doesn’t always make sense. It’s messy and emotional and can get in the way of all your best laid plans.
It certainly did for me. Falling for the funny, gorgeous boy who lived down the road when I was at university didn’t make sense at all. I was there to study, to make connections, and to start working on the political career I always thought I’d have. Instead I spent most of my time with the clever, crazy physics student who twenty years later is still the love of my life.
We’ve had our share of obstacles. For two years we lived on different sides of the country, trying to keep our relationship going at a time when mobile phones and social networking were still in their infancy. But love can act like a glue, sticking things together when you feel like everything is falling apart. It breaches barriers and crosses borders, and couldn’t give a damn whether you’re ready for it or not.
I think that’s why love is so much fun to write about. You can take two characters who think their lives are going in a certain direction then turn them upside down with a simple chemical attraction. It’s exciting to watch the fall out, to see them try to deny their feelings, and pretend that love isn’t going to make them change their paths. Some characters struggle more than others, but in a perfect romance, eventually they have to give in to the inevitable.
For me, that’s the happiest ending of all.

 


Fix You is available from the following retailers:

AMAZON UK | iBOOKSTORE KOBO | NOOK | GOOGLE PLAY

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